Author Archives: Jan Leonhard Neumann

About Jan Leonhard Neumann

Systems Practitioner, Projektmanager, Organisationsberater und Rechtsanwalt. Tätig als Projektkoordinator im Hochschulbibliothekszentrum des Landes Nordrhein-Westfalen (hbz) und Mitglied des Fachausschuss Bildung der Deutschen UNESCO Kommission e.V.

Moving the OER Policy Registry to the OER World Map

JOIN US AT THE OER POLICY FORUM IN WARSAW!

Creative Commons defines OER policies “as legislation, institutional policies, and/or funder mandates that lead to the creation, increased use, and/or support for improving OER”. OER policy making has been of major concern within the global open education movement, since policies – at their best – can be powerful top-down-instruments which can support the mainstreaming of OER on national, provincial / state and institutional levels.

To support the development and implementation of effective OER policies, Creative Commons provides the Open Educational Resources (OER) Policy Registry, a database of current and proposed open education policies from around the world. The registry allows anybody to easily share, update, and browse open education policies and legislation. It also hosts supporting policy resources such as case studies and guides.

During Open Education Global Conference 2018, Creative Commons and the OER World Map Project agreed to migrate the registry to the OER World Map for two reasons: Continue reading

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Identifying Lighthouses

The Ljubjlana Action Plan highlights the need to identify and share models of good practice, which have proven to be sustainable ways to organize the production, adoption, sharing and use of Open Educational Resources. We believe that learning from experiences made in other countries will be key for a fast and effective global mainstreaming of OER and that the OER World Map is the ideal tool to support this collaborative learning process. Continue reading

Open Education Week 2017: Making Sense of the OER World Map through the Use of Folksonomies

The OER World Map collects and visualizes information on organizations, persons, projects, services and events related to OER. Using linked open data technology, all entries can be easily connected, allowing the World Map to provide a the most complete and reliable model of the global OER movement so far.

At its core, the platform provides a fundamental data set, which supports a multitude of use cases. Currently we concentrate on three main user stories, which, in its shortest form, can be described as 1) finding OER sources, 2) connecting OER actors and 3) providing statistics on the OER movement. Arguably, after two years of development, the platform starts to offer real value for its users. Nevertheless it still can be difficult to find relevant data using the World Map platform. During Open Education Week 2017, we are planning to show, how the simple but powerful tool of folksonomies can be used to generate helpful lists of data included in the OER World Map. Continue reading

Update to the OER community

The following project update was sent to the Athabasca 
OER-community list at the 4th of October 2016.

Dear friends of the OER World Map,

I hope you all had a great summer break! I would like to give you an update of the development of the OER World Map project. As many of you will know, this work followed from the initial discussion in this community 2012. 2013 the Hewlett Foundation decided to fund the project. After an initial development of several prototypes, the North-Rhine Westphalian Library Service Centre (hbz) based in Cologne, Germany, started developing a production system in 2015. All proposals are available online.

The OER World Map can be seen as an Social Education Management Information System which aims at accelerating the evolution of the global OER ecosystem by strengthening the ability of the OER community to organize itself. It combines elements of a social networking platform, a business information system, a geoinformation system and a library catalogue and will contribute to overcoming the challenge of mainstreaming OER by collecting and visualizing the building blocks of the global OER ecosystem. By doing so, it connects OER actors with each other, facilitates sharing of experiences and resources between them and fosters collective learning. At the same time it provides a sound operational information basis for developing infrastructure and policies in favor of Open Education. Continue reading

Can we map Open Education Week?

During a small research project starting during Open Education Week, we will try to look for ways to map Open Education Week, e.g. to put the activities of Open Education Week on the OER World Map.

Our interest in mapping Open Education Week data is twofold: on the one hand we made progress defining our data model by taking real world examples and trying to model them on the OER World Map. Initially we used OER stories for doing this on a micro level, targeting individual actors and activities. Just recently we produced the OER Atlas, giving us the experience of collecting data of a complete country. Collecting Open Education Week data will provide us with another interesting example of collecting real world data on a macro level. Continue reading

Printing the OER World Map: The OER Atlas

Last week, during the OERde 16 Festival, we published the first Version of the OER Atlas. The OERde 16 Festival was a major OER event, organized by Jöran und Konsorten and oncampus, which took place in Berlin (28th February – 1st March). The festival consisted out of several events, starting with a two day barcamp, followed by a one day expert forum, which aimed at connecting OER activists with OER policymakers. The glamorous highlight of the festival was the OER-Award, which recognized established OER initiatives as well as promising newcomers.

The OER World Map project was one of several partners of the festival and jointly responsible for the generation of the OER Atlas, a printed book with 102 pages, which documents OER activities from Germany, Austria and Switzerland. Though a printed book might seem somewhat anachronistic, we assumed that there are many people – especially within the field of policy making – who still prefer print. Continue reading